Nathan Whipple | Tier10lab
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Posts By Nathan Whipple

Driving the Future: Introducing the 2019 Acura RDX

January 16, 2018 |

The 2018 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) features the world’s top automakers with their futures on display, and after Acura’s debut of their 2019 RDX Prototype, the future looks brighter than ever. Read More

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2018 Honda Accord Secures 2018 North American Car of the Year Award

January 15, 2018 |

Honda has announced that for the third consecutive year, they’ll be taking home a prestigious North American “of the Year” award via their new 10th generation Accord. Read More

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Six-Second Survival: Will Broadcast Thrive, or Simply Survive, in an Age of Digital Domination?

December 29, 2017 |

Six seconds.

That’s not a whole lot of time to do much of anything, really. You’ve used it up already reading this article, and if you’re to believe the comScore study on the matter, you’ve probably already determined if you’re going to continue reading in that time. This data has fueled the transition to six-second ads on platforms like YouTube and Facebook, and now television has found itself with some questions: are six-second ads worth pursuing? Will they succeed?

Is it too late?

Shorter ads are nothing new. 30-second ads soon gave way to the 15s of the MTV generation, and now with the rise (and fall) of numerous short-form video services, it seems the trend of fitting more and more content into a shorter amount of time will only continue. According to Fox Sports president Eric Shanks, this is only a good thing. But it may be a strategy too little, too late for a traditional medium such as television. According to a recent Nielsen study, millennials, while less inclined to change the channel compared to their demographic counterparts, lay claim to the lowest levels of ad recollection and program engagement. The problem? Multiple screens and apps fighting for attention, such as millennial dominated apps such as Snapchat, which sees four out of five millennials frequenting the service. The solution?

If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.

Fox dipped the first toe into the pool, staging 29-second advertising blocks during their presentation of the Teen Choice Awards. These blocks featured a five-second intro message imploring users to stay tuned for the rest of the programming, followed by ads of similar length promoting various products and services, all within their own contained six-second window. After announcing the success of the test run, they announced the placement of such ads into their NFL programming. It’s a move anticipated to keep in younger crowds a la the strategies employed by Facebook and YouTube, but according to Dave Penski, a chief executive of Publics Media Exchange America, there now exists a whole new set of challenges with shorter form advertisements. Six-second ads, he insists, may not be a good fit for advertisers looking to sell more complicated products and services, and should largely be used by larger brands to reinforce brand recognition and image. He remains optimistic about the transition to six-second ads, calling it “an innovation that’s more cross-screen than others because there’s already…a huge amount of six-second advertising that’s going on out there.”

So where does this leave you, the average television viewer?

Well on the surface, this change is nothing new: the internet has slowly shaped the direction of television for years now, as companies like Netflix and Hulu drive the increasing shift towards subscription-based, video-on-demand services. Cable TV is a dying medium, and this move to incorporate six-second advertising, (a move prompted by, you guessed it, the internet), is akin to showing up on Christmas with last year’s hot item. Many of today’s youth are rarely subjected to traditional advertising to begin with, let alone live in a household with a traditional television service. While these services owe their existence, and for a large part their content libraries, to television, they continue to innovate while TV is left in the early 2000’s. If the medium truly wishes to succeed in this six-second world, it’s time to innovate, rather than replicate.

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Instagram Announces Canvas Ad Integration for Stories

September 12, 2017 |

After bringing immersive, full page ads in March to their Stories, Instagram continues to expand in the realm of mobile marketing through integration with Facebook’s Canvas.
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Redesigned, Redefined: 2018 RLX to Debut at Monterey Automotive Week

August 11, 2017 |

In a restyle being referred to as “transformational,” the 2018 RLX is set to debut during the prestigious Monterey Automotive Week, August 15-19 on the Monterey Peninsula. The overall goal of the redesign, according to Acura Vice President and General Manager Jon Ikeda, was “creating road presence and styling that better reflect underlying performance capabilities of the vehicle,” and as Acura’s best-performing sedan to date, the 2018 RLX spares no expense when it comes to delivering power, luxury, and performance unlike any of its contemporaries.
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2018 Accord Set to Maintain Market Dominance through Redefined Look and Feel

July 14, 2017 |

Originally teased this past June, Honda has officially debuted their tenth generation Accord live from Detroit via YouTube livestream. Featuring a bold new redesign and a host of new tech, the 2018 Accord promises a mid-sized sedan experience unlike anything else currently on the market.
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2018 Accord Teased, Full Reveal to Come July 14

June 20, 2017 |

When you’re a 31-time recipient of Car and Driver’s 10Best award, it’s hard not to draw attention, and even though the all new 2018 Accord was only just teased, it was enough to get the automotive industry humming with excitement.
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I Stream, Therefore I Am: What the Rise of Live Video Says About Our Culture Today

May 1, 2017 |

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When the popular streaming service Twitch announced late last year that they were creating an “IRL” (or “In Real Life”) category for their website, I was a bit skeptical. Up until that point, Twitch had been used predominantly by individuals who wished to stream themselves playing video games. This usually was accompanied by users sending messages into the channel’s chat feed, interacting with fellow watchers and the streamers themselves. Although the social aspect existed in this regard, I still questioned the decision of Twitch to stray so far from its roots: why would anyway want to watch someone eating dinner, or working out at the gym, or simply walking around town? Surely, I thought to myself, people have better things to occupy themselves with.

And then I found myself watching a guy in Germany build a new desk for his PC.
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